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20121027
20121104
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in going there. this weekend, president obama will be finishing topping off his ohio campaigning in central ohio. in the past tv of cycles, we -- past two cycles, we have seen the democratic candidate come up in northeast ohio and try to make that pushed. i think he is comfortable with the get out to vote efforts. he ought to go down -- he has to appeal to the swing areas. more independent voters. and you had this educated, affluent group, the base around ohio state university. and that has been critical. in the end, if you show that map, ohio is broken up, we have said it for years into 5 ohios. those five areas, plus some of the border areas, we have about seven media markets. it makes a very expensive to campaign here. in gubernatorial races and some presidential races there will go to west virginia to reach the southern ohio parts. that is where the bigger market is and that has to be part of the mix, too. ohio is five ohios. host: we talked about the issues, the top issues in ohio in this election cycle -- can we talk about the issues? guest: this is like to been a shock to your viewer
has canceled a number of events tomorrow and is instead campaigning in ohio with paul ryan. on monday, obama will head to the florida institute of technology. in about half an hour, we will take you live to lynchburg for the event with vice-president joe biden and his wife. until then, a look at the battleground state of north carolina from this morning's "washington journal. tell us what makes north carolina battleground state. guest: traditionally, it has been a red state. it is moving more and more into a competitive state, and there are several reasons why. one of the things our organization does is ask every year the voters where they stand in terms of conservative level. only florida and virginia, in terms of southern states, are to the left, so it is pretty divided. it also has political progressives, so it has been pretty much a modern state traditionally. there has been a tremendous influx of people from around the country. particularly in the big metropolitan areas, and none has been changing the politics over the years. in addition, it has a significant african-american pop
electoral votes. obama won by 10 percentage points. unemployment is mirroring what we have nationwide, 8.2%. neighboring ohio is getting an awful lot of attention with their 18 electoral votes. what is so different between ohio and pennsylvania that makes ohio more of a battleground than pennsylvania at the moment? guest: the essential differences ohio has a good many more moderate independent voters at this point which are likely to either vote republican or democrat. as i pointed out a moment ago, the recent democrats have done well is because they have captured the suburbs in our state in the recent presidential elections which has been the defining difference. in the middle of ohio and columbus, that is a battleground. there, obviously with cleveland, but in the northeastern part of the state being democratic and cincinnati and out west be more republican. ohio just has a larger pool of these swing voters, if you will, and are more evenly balanced between the democratic and republican regions of the state. pennsylvania has a huge portion of moderate independent-minded voters and they
am pro-barack obama. and a lot of his early voting on the democrat side, there are a lot of voters that normally would not vote on election day. is that why he is getting a big push in ohio and other states? they might have made an effort to locate first-time voters and voters that normally would not vote on election day. is this not true? i want to make a comment after you are done. guest: so far, where we have party registration, there are a good number of democrats who have voted already. the polls are showing that obama is leading the early boat much like he did in 2008. that is an aberration from our part -- previous count. from previous elections before the 2008, typically, republicans won the early voting. we have had such a high volume now and the obama campaign is encouraging their supporters to vote early. we have seen a change in behavior when campaigns can take advantage of early voting to encourage their supporters and mobilize them over a longer period of time. that is was going on on the democrat side. if you look at the numbers, there are more republicans voting ear
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4